Sunday, October 01, 2017

Lots to see and learn in Banbury today.


Well Banbury Canal Day, despite being cancelled and then uncancelled, went pretty well. The good folk of hereabouts turned out in lots of thousands to buy food and crafts from the various market areas and the trading boats, there were long queues for the boat trips and the live music outside the social club was popular, as was the kids funfair in the park. We just sat there looking pretty, well Herbie did, resplendent in our bunting.



Lots of local charities had stalls too, as did IWA and CRT, who also had a boat with some bits of lock on it. Can you identify what the bits are, and do you know the correct name of them?


I had a long chat on Friday with Nigel, (or was it Kevin? Maybe it was Tarquin. Anyway..) CRTs Head of Operations for the Oxford Canal. He's been with BW /CRT for 22 years and seems to know every nut and bolt of every lock on the canal. Definately a hands on sort of bloke. We talked about various locks down this way that had had or still have paddle problems and he was explaining some of the challenges they face in getting them fixed. The largest challenge seems to be funding, the cost of some of the castings required for some of the paddle gear is eye watering. Then there is the problem of boaters who think they know better trying to operate faulty paddles that have been taped up awaiting repair, and making a matters a lot worse. That's what happened at Marston Doles last week.

I asked about the crumbling brickwork on some of the lift bridges. He said their aim was to repair or rebuild two per annum, but sometimes the budget won't stand it. The one they rebuilt at Somerton this year cost 200 grand!! (I think I heard him right).

Reservoir levels, he said, were still a concern. Apparently a lot of this year's rain has been isolated and not where the reservoirs can catch it. Off the top of his head he was able to quote me how many millimeters depth was left in each of his reservoirs. There is a lot of back pumping going on. Apparently water is being pumped up all the way from Leamington to the Braunston pound and then on up the Napton flight to feed the summit. He did quote me how many litres per second they pump, but as he pointed out, it takes a helluva lot of pumping to replace what is lost by a busy morning on a lock flight.

So tomorrow we finish our four week cruise. It's been very good indeed. No doubt later I'll be able to remember more things to tell you.

4 comments:

Giles Williams said...

Long cues (as used by short-armed snooker players) or long queues?

Neil Corbett said...

Thanks Giles. Glad somebody hangs on my every word:-)

Halfie said...

Cill bumpers?

Vallypee said...

Yikes. All those repairs are very very high maintenance, aren't they? What figures! Great photos, Neil! Sounds like a good time was had by all!